Date/Time
Date(s) - 09/21/2017
7:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Location
CMC Climax Molybdenum Leadership Center


FREE The Upside of Fear: How and Why we Enjoy Thrills and Chills 

Fear is a universal human experience, but do we really understand it? If we’re so terrified of monsters and serial killers, why do we flock to the theaters to see them? Why do people avoid thinking about death, but jump out of planes and swim with sharks? This lecture will not only cover the science of fear, but explain why some of us love the thrill of a rollercoaster while others detest it. Dr. Kerr will explain fear from a physiological, psychological, and sociological perspective to show how fear is not all bad, and can even be good for us.

Margee will share stories and findings from her book, Scream: Chilling Adventures in the Science of Fear

  • In this eye-opening, adventurous book, she takes us on a tour of the world’s scariest experiences: into an abandoned prison long after dark, hanging by a cord from the highest tower in the Western hemisphere, and deep into Japan’s mysterious “suicide forest.” She even goes on a ghost hunt with a group of paranormal adventurers. Along the way, Kerr shows us the surprising science from the newest studies of fear—what it means, how it works, and what it can do for us. Full of entertaining science and the thrills of a good ghost story, this book will make you think, laugh—and scream. –Amazon.

Margee Kerr has a PhD in sociology from the University of Pittsburgh, where she currently teaches and conducts research on fear, with a focus on how and why people engage with frightening or thrilling material and activities like haunted houses, the paranormal, and thrill rides. Dr. Kerr is the co-investigator on a first-of-its-kind study measuring fear in the real world by collecting psychophysiology data measuring how the brain and body respond in real-life threatening situations. She is the author of SCREAM: Chilling Adventures in the Science of Fear, named as a must read by the Washington Post. Her work has been featured in the New York Times, Parade, Atlantic Monthly, and NPR’s Science Friday, among other places.

Kerr says her research can have implications beyond theme parks and haunted houses by helping people understand how to tolerate stress. “We’re trying to find the best ways to teach people how to experience their emotions in ways that are healthy and not debilitating,” she said. “When people lean into the experience and test themselves in an environment that is safe, they come to learn they can handle stress and they are stronger than they thought they were.” –The Daily Mail. For more information visit www.collegiatepeaksforum.org

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